Learn English Tenses: Past Simple, Past Continuous, Past Perfect, or Present Perfect?

Learn English Tenses: Past Simple, Past Continuous, Past Perfect, or Present Perfect?



Are you sure which past tense to use and when? Do you understand why? Save years of English mistakes by watching this important lesson in which I teach you about past tenses. Discover your strengths and weaknesses in a few minutes. Then, follow my suggestions to master the grammar tenses you’ll need to use more than any other in English.
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TRANSCRIPT

Hi. I’m Rebecca from engVid, and this lesson is going to save you years of English mistakes. Why? Because it’s a diagnostic lesson. In just a few minutes you’ll find out what you know and don’t know regarding the past tenses in English. And why is that important? For two reasons. First, you can focus on what you don’t know and improve those areas and improve quickly, and second because the past tenses are among the most important tenses that we use in English. Okay? And at the end of the lesson after you’ve done the exercise and you find out what you might get wrong or right, I’ll show you exactly how to improve, what you can do. Some simple steps. Okay? Let’s get started.

So, number one: “It rains all day yesterday.” Okay? So these are all sentences in the past tense. Okay? There are four tenses we’re covering: Past simple, past continuous, present perfect, and past perfect. Okay? So, all of these sentences have some mistakes. You try to find out: What’s the mistake? If you know, then you know that part. If you don’t, we’ll see what to do. So: “It rains all day yesterday.” What’s wrong with that sentence? Okay. So, we’re talking about yesterday so we know it’s in the past, so what’s wrong is here, this verb is right now in the present simple. It should be… It should be in the past. So then this sentence should be in the past simple. So if you didn’t know that, then… Then you need to review the past simple. Okay?

Number two: “Have you seen Maria last week? Have you seen Maria last week?” What’s wrong with that sentence? Or that question, rather. Can you find the mistake? Okay, so the mistake is this: When we say: “Have you seen”, that’s which tense? Present perfect. But then we go on to say: “Have you seen Maria last week?” That’s a problem, because when we use the present perfect tense, we cannot use a finished time with it. If you use a finished time, like last week, then you have to change this question and make it into past simple. For example: “Did you see Maria last week?” That’s one way to fix that question. And the other way, if we wanted to keep it present perfect-right?-we would say: “Have you seen Maria this week?” for example. Okay? That… Of course, that has a different meaning, but if you’re going to use this tense then if you have a timeframe you can only talk about time which is either still going on, like this week, today, this month, this year, and so on. Okay? So if you made a mistake here, remember to review present perfect. Okay? Just make a note of that.

Next: “Gary studied when I arrived. Gary studied when I arrived.” What’s wrong there? There is a little mistake there, and it’s here. Okay? This should be: “Gary was studying”-right?-“when I arrived”. Now, “was studying” is past continuous. So, why do we need past continuous there? Because the action of studying takes some time. Right? It doesn’t happen in one second. So he was studying, and studying, and studying, and then in the middle of this studying I arrived. “Arrived” doesn’t take time, so “arrived” can be in the past simple tense. That’s fine. I arrived, it’s finished, it’s over. But Gary was studying, and studying, and studying, and studying, and I came in the middle of that. Okay? So these are the kinds of things you have to know about these tenses in order to use them correctly. So, if you made a mistake here, remember to review past continuous. Remember at the end of the lesson I’ll tell you exactly how you can review these. Okay?

Next, number four: “When have you sent the email?” Okay? “When have you sent the email?” Okay. So, the problem here, again, is that the tense that’s used is present perfect. But with present perfect we cannot use the word “when”. If you use the question word “when”, then you need to change this entire question to past simple. “When did you send the email?” Okay? “When did you send the email?” Because when I ask you that question you’re going to tell me sometime in the past that’s finished and over. So that’s past simple, and not present perfect. So if you made a mistake here, you should really review past simple, but more importantly also, again, present perfect. Okay? A little bit of both. If you just said here: “Have you sent the email?” then it’s fine and it’s present perfect. Okay? But if you need to use the question word “when”, remember to change it to past simple. Good.

Number five: “Did you ever see this movie? Did you ever see this movie?”

#Learn #English #Tenses #Simple #Continuous #Perfect #Present #Perfect

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Irregular Verbs in English – Groups 1 & 2

Irregular Verbs in English – Groups 1 & 2



Learning irregular verbs in English can be a long and difficult process. To help you with it, I will teach you how to break them into categories with recognizable patterns. With my method, irregular verbs do not have to be so unpredictable. I will teach you the base form of the verb, the simple past, and the past participle. For extra help, download and print our list of irregular verbs to study with the video and to practice on your own:

Test yourself with our quiz:
And watch the next lesson on Group 3 irregular verbs:

TRANSCRIPT

Hi. My name’s Ronnie. I’m going to try and help you do something fantastic for your English grammar, speaking, and general wellbeing. This is a very, very time-consuming and difficult task that you will have to do when you are learning English. They’re verbs.

We have many verbs in English. We have what are called regular verbs. A regular verb will end in “ed”. For example: “use”, “used”. So, regular verb. We like to call them “ed” verbs just to be fancy. So, regular verbs are easy because they all both end in “ed” if you have different forms.

Now, what I’m going to go over today is the difference in forms between simple past and the past participle. So, we have the simple present tense, which is something like: “I eat pizza.” When we use simple present, it’s something we do every day. Then we have what’s called the simple past, or you can say past simple. It doesn’t matter; it’s the same. So, we have the present tense, we have the past, and we have what’s called the past participle. Have you heard of this before? The past participle, it’s so difficult for me to say, so I’m going to call it p.p. from now on. So, the past participle, you’re going to have to use if you learn present perfect. Now, if you don’t know what these are yet, that’s okay. If you’ve heard of these before and you know what they are, that’s fantastic. Past perfect and all the forms of passive voice that we have in English.

If these are new kind of ideas to you, please don’t worry, but it’s not past, present “prefect” it’s present perfect. We must be perfect. If these are new things for you… I’ll get this spelling right, I promise. There we go, present perfect. If these are new concepts to you, don’t worry about it. Okay? Just focus on learning these groups, and we have a very, very beautiful list of verbs to help you in the resources section on www.engvid.com. Go there now. You can put it… It’s in PDF file, so you can print it out and you can have the list in front of you to memorize, to remember, to help you.

What I want you do is I want to introduce you to-doo, doo, doo, doo-group one and two of irregular verbs. Once you do this, there’s also a video on group number three, which is the most difficult. So we’re starting with the easiest ones, yay. And again, this is groups one and two. You can find them, a list of these on the resources section.

So, past participle, I will now call p.p. Yay. We have the present tense, simple past or past, and then the past participle. The first group is the most delicious. It’s the best because we don’t have to change anything. Woo-hoo. So, if in the present tense the verb is “cut”, the past tense is “cut”, and so is the past participle or the p.p. So, we have: “cut”, “cut”, “cut”. For example, if we use present tense: “I cut the pizza.” If we use past tense, I can say: “Yesterday, I cut the grass.” And if I wanted to use the past participle, let’s say I want to use present perfect, I can say: “The grass has been cut.” So, we don’t need to change the verb. These are some examples of verbs that we don’t have to change.

So, these are the easiest, and probably your favourite. We have: “cost”, “hit”, “hurt”, ow. So if you… Something hits you, you are hurt. “Let”, “put”, “quit”. If the simple past is “shut”, what do you think the past participle would be? It’s the same, so this would also be “shut”. So, I could say: “I shut the door.”, “The door was shut.”, or: “The door has been shut.” And in the last one we have the word “bet”. Again, we don’t have to change it, so it’s: “bet”, “bet”, “bet”. I bet you like this lesson. Yeah? Okay? So these ones are the easiest and the most fun because they don’t have to change. Whew.

We’re going to go into group two. Group two is okay, because we only have to change one time now. So, if we have the present tense, section A, all we’re doing to make it past or use the past participle, is we’re changing it, and all of these ones are going to have a “d” ending. So, present tense we have “sell”, “sold”, and “sold”. I hear a lot of people doing this: “Sell, sold, sold”, so they’re saying: “sell”, “sold”, “sold”. If you repeat it in your head, it will help you remember it. We have “tell”, “told”, “told”; “feed”…

#Irregular #Verbs #English #Groups #amp

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